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comments@captioncolorado.com >> couric: tonight, emergency workers return to japan's crippled nuclear plant after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but
where you left off. more than ever, when we talk about the nightmare in japan, we're really talking about two nightmares. the nuclear one and everything else. again today, fire broke out at that devastated fukushima daiichi plant. and another blast of radiation escaped, for reasons still not entirely clear. the few remaining workers had to leave but they came right back in even greater numbers when the danger eased. this crisis stems from overheated fuel rods but elsewhere in japan, a cold snap, including snow, adding to the misery. searching, supporting, surviving, all of it is made more grueling because of the weather. officially the death toll topped 4,000, with more than 8,000 considered missing. this woman is scouring the rubble for her uncle. she thought she may have found his shoe. the nation heard from the emperor, reserveder pot direst of national emergencies. the emperor act key per act hes heart is broken. the volunteer utility workers who have been exposed to life-threatening radiation levels ots fukushima daiichi. their company hasn't released personal information abou
that there hasn't been a broader call for help from japan may have something to do with it. relief efforts right now are focused on immediate needs like food, water and medical care. all goods and services that can be purchased locally. internationally charities like the red cross, world vision and save the children are on the ground doi ining exactly that already. that's why cash donations now directed at those charities may be the best thing americans can do to help the victims when their need is the most. for more information, go to cnn.com/impact. >>> that's it for me. brooke baldwin takes over now with "newsroom". >>> my promise to you, we won't get too far from japan chblt we'll get to the new images and information there in just a moment. >>> first, i want you to listen to what secretary of state hillary clinton has now just told cnn's wolf blitzer. >> we don't want any ambiguity. only the security council can authorize action, and if they do authorize action, there needs to be a true international response, including arab leadership and partnership. >> wolf is traveling right along with
on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be exposed to are potentially lethal in a short period of time. it's nearly six days now since the earthquake and tsunami killed at least 4300 people and damaged the nuclear reactors. today, u.s. officials told americans within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate the area or stay indoors. that is two and a half times as wide as the danger zone established by the japanese. harry smith begins tonight's coverage of the disaster in japan. >> reporter: in a sign of how grave japan's crisis has become, the emperor, akihito, made an unprecedented television address, acknowledging that he is deeply worried, urging his subjects not to give up. it did little to calm a country increasingly distrustful, given the wave of conflicting reports and mixed messages. >> ( translated ): there is both positive and negative news. i don't know which i should believe. >> reporter: and toda
in that country. stocks continue to teeter, could japan's economy cause the u.s. to stumble? we'll look into that. moments ago, a new after shock described by our msnbc team in tokyo as huge and lasting a long time here, we'll hear from chris jansing on that in a home. the threat of a nuclear catastrophe still surrounds japan and a cloud of fear here. the world is watching closely those nuclear reactors at the fukushima plant. 50 workers were ordered out when things got dicey. now they're going back in at great personal risk to try and figure out how to get a handle on things. fires, explosions, and radiation leaks remain a constant threat. it seems no one can predict how this situation will end. the u.s. army trying to ramp up its humanitarian effort to help the people of japan. more than 10,000 people already listed missing or dead. half a million have been evacuated and the cost of the destruction could top $100 billion. the sato family was lucky enough to survive. but when they were returned to their neighborhood, they found there is nothing left for them, their entire town is destroyed, gone
." >> worke t-o reenter fukushima nuclear plant in japan as the battle to control it. increasing temperatures and snow hit the worst affected f -- areas. half of a million refugees are living in television shot -- living in shelters. in a rare television address, the japanese emperor addresses the public. also in this program, renewed unrest in bahrain as security forces clear anti-government demonstrators. pakistan has indicted a cia contractor on two counts of murder. workers at the japanese fukushima nuclear plant have returned to the site after earlier having to abandon it. steam was seen coming from the site as they attempted to cool the facility. japanese media reports said that fears for radiation levels above the plant. >> hello and welcome to tokyo. five days after that devastating earthquake and tsunami, the crisis continues. today there are reports of another fire in a helicopter that was called in to drop help -- to drop water had to turn back because of fears of radiation levels. despite that, government authorities are saying that radiation levels at the moment, while higher tha
in japan and beyond as a nation in i sis is forced to make very tough decisions. the battle for libya intensifying as rebels take a beating and government forces engage in nonstop shelling. will benghazi fall to moammar gadhafi. they are criticizing the president on not responding to issues at home and a broad. its all on "happening now." a good wednesday to you. i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. we are here in the fox newsroom and happening right now as jon just mentioned brand-new developments in the nuclear crisis that is gripping japan and company company taourg all of our attention. emergency workers who have have now dubbed the fukushima 50 risking their lives to prevent further disaster. this after another fir fire has broken out at the nuke plant. radiation is 300 times normal. jon: the numbers today are staggering, millions across japan struggling with very little food and water. nearly half a million people there are homeless now, and some 3700 listed as dead, but that number sure will he will rise with ten thousand people still missing in one northeastern city alone. mar
) you heard people saying what's happening in japan so far is worse than three mile island, but not as bad as chernobyl, well, okay. it is good to understand that, but it is also good to understand that there's a lot of room between the consequences of three mile island and chernobyl. not just the magnitude and type of accidents themselves, but the consequences of those accidents. how much radioactivity was released, and what it did to people. the on-going crisis in japan is about trying to minimize the amount of radiation that's going to be released from the reactors at daiichi. understanding the difference between this disaster and previous nuclear disasters is empirical. it is understandable even if you're not a physicist. i certainly am not. we have six reactors in japan together at daiichi. three of them, numbers one, two, and three were on, were producing power when the earthquake hit. they automatically shut down, now it has been a matter of keeping enough water flowing into the cooling systems of the reactors to keep the hot radioactive fuel rods covered up so they
plant in japan. right now, emergency workers are risking their lives to prevent a complete nuclear meltdown. crews began the first of four helicopter water drops. at the same time, workers on the ground are using a water cannon meant for riots to shoot water directly into one of the reactors. it is a desperate last ditch effort to keep spent nuclear fuel rods from melting. in a potentially troubling sign white steam was again seen rising from three of the reactors. radiation levels at the plant dangerously high. japan's electric company is working desperately to reconnect power at the plant today. meantime, damning reports about the owner of the japanese power plant. accord to the australian, the owner falsified safety data and said in 1989 tokyo electric injected air into the containment vessel of a reactor number one to lower the leak rate and when caught apologized for "dishonest practices." now, abc's martha raddatz with the latest on the last ditch effort to saint planet. >>> 50 workers inside the plant working in the dark with nothing but flash lights wearing overalls and hea
on this site, there are life threatening doses of radiation. >> japan's emperor addressed his nation today. an extraordinary event reserved for times of war or dire national crises. he says he's touched by the japanese people's calm and order in the face of disaster. >>> well, foreigners scrambled to leave tokyo today. france is urging its citizens to get out now or at least head to southern japan. japan has lost control of fukushima. evacuees say they don't trust the japanese government to be forthcoming. >> i don't believe what i've been told. you know, people are evacuating. all foreigners are evacuating, large multi-national companies, foreign companies are evacuating. you don't really know what to believe. it's better to play it safe. >>> harrowing new video of the moments the tsunami struck. people scream as they try to outrun the water. >>> this is said to be ground zero for the tsunami. a coastal town home to 17,000 people. most are feared dead. a cnn i-reporter sent us this video at the moment the 9.0 earthquake struck. shot it at a tokyo department store. remember, tokyo is 230 m
in japan isç "out o control." meantime, u.s. forces operating in that country are being moved even further away from the power plant for safety. a live report from tokyo straight ahead. plus police and protesters face off in pakistan just hours after reports that the u.s. paid more than $2 million for the release of a cia contractor accused of murder. new comments on the situation from the secretary of state. >>> and he reached out online to people he never met in person convincing them to kill themselves. now a judge says the minnesota man in this picture must go to jail. >> it's not fair. it's not fair. >>> a push to rally in michigan. protesters still at odds with the state's governor over the budget join forces at the state capital. the latest in the on going standoff between public union workers in this country and some republican lawmakers. >>> i'm tamron hall. "news nation" is following new details on the nuclear crisis in japan. the secretary-general of the international atomic energy association says he's headed to japan as soon as possible as workers at the fukushima plant strugg
by the moment in japan as more radiation is spewing in the atmosphere from the damaged nuclear plant. david piper in the air base west of tokyo. good morning, david. >> martha: the nuclear crisis is a dangerous level now. the fukushima nuclear complex has had a number of a explosion and they are saying it is moving to a dangerous level and the international nuclear agency said that fire started in a storage plant that spent nuclear fuel. japanese officials told them the fire was out now because they reportedly had help from the u.s. military. radiation leveled have sored around the complex. japanese authorities told people to seal doors and winnows and stay in home and avoid going out at all. japanese prime minister said radiation is released from the three reactors from the nuclear plant and a high risk of more radiation coming out. reactors are over heat raising the risk. japan has imposed a no fly zone over the plant. high levels of radiation in tokyo and now reportedly dropping. but just outside of tokyo there are above the normal level by 10 times. back to you in the studio. >> martha:
. >>shepard: i am shephard smith reporting from a frigid night from japan as the nuclear situation appeared earlier to be spinning out-of-control, and we are just getting word that the operator of the the tsunami crippled nuclear plant has almost complete add brand influence power line that could restore electricity to the complex and possibly solve the crisis. this as the head of the international atomic industry confirmed part of a meltdown if reactors one, two, and three of the crippled fukushima power plant calling the situation "very serious." and says he is headed to japan now to deal with the crisis in person. right now, it is difficult to get specifics about what exactly is happening inside the plant. we do know a fuel storage pond at one reactor is believed to be leaking radiation now. and there may be some damage to the containment vessel. crews are desperately trying to keep the fuel rods cool, to prevent them from burning through the concrete containers, and sending mass amounts of radioactive material into the atmosphere. japan's defense minister reports that shoppers had to ab
spread to other parts of japan. it does not appear that it poses any threat to either hawaii or territories or the rest of the united states. >>> andrea mitchell just sat down with secretary of state hillary clinton in cairo. what she says about the crisis in japan, the wave of revolutions in the middle east and her surprise stop today in tahrir square. >> it's very exciting and very moving. and to see where this revolution happened and all that it has meantç to the world is extraordinary for me. >>> also this hour, our exclusive with senator kirsten gillibrand. what she's calling on the president to do in terms of ending the war in afghanistan. >>> good day, everybody, i'm nora o'donnell live in washington. andrea's completed interview is straight ahead. >>> we begin with japan. first the human toll. six days after the quake and tsunami, the official figures stand at 4,164 dead. 7,843 missing. the total now more than 12,000. at the fukushima nuclear plant, workers are desperately trying to cool the reactors. two reactors are believed to have been damaged. two more are at r
americans who are in japan it is time to consider getting out today, thursday, march 17th, 2011. >> from nbc news, this is a special edition of "today," disaster in japan with matt lauer and meredith vieira. live from studio 1a in rockefeller plaza. >> good morning. welcome to "today" on a thursday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm savannah guthrie in for meredith who is on assignment. a sign of how desperate things are in japan that they are willing to try such a long shot. helicopters dropping water from the air. >> want to take a look at the video right now. as you can see when they do that a significant amount of that water seems to be dispersed by the wind. now massive high pressure water cannons, the kind you have seen police use on rioters will be used to hoes dose down the reac from the ground. more on this desperate attempt just ahead. >>> growing disagreement today between officials in japan and here in the u.s. over the severity of the situation. the chair of the u.s. regulatory commission believes a storage pool holding highly radioactive spent fuel rods may be completely empty at
: "fox and friends" starts right now. >> martha: the last on the story out of japan. workers in the failed nuclear physicists riactor site are getting set to go back to work. one report said the workers niver left that site and then reports that they evacuated 50 corgous people who were staying there to try to cool the nuclear physicists reactors . we have had conflicting reports. >> brian: four of those men are missing. they were working on one of the reactors. we'll follow up on that. >> martha: unbelievable story . new pictures show at least two of the plant's reactors are completely destroyed . we have seen the araeil shots . trying to figure out what to do next to prevent a complete meltdown there. >> brian: when tempco was fulling -- pulling out the prime minister demanded what was going on and demanded they go back. >> steve: we'll go to ykoto air force base. david piper is standing by. >>reporter: the new crisis piraling oust control. in a desperate move japanese military helicopter was sent up with a huge bucket of water to dump it on the fukushima plant. they had to
and frayed nerves. the latest from japan. how is the radiation in that country now different from what you absorb every day? and they put the squeeze on pro-democracy demonstrators and a look at where the obama administration stands. live from the studio in washington. this is "special report." i'm bret baier. the news from japan continues to be mostly bad. but there was a positive note today, as the owner of the crippled nuclear plant says the new power line is almost done that will enable the restart of electric powered pumps and possibly a solution to the overheating crisis. elevated radiation levels have been detected outside the 20-mile emergency perimeter. the head of the u.s. nuclear agency says there is no more water in the spent fuel pool at the reactor plant. greg palkot is live in teak owe where it's just -- tokyo where it's just after 7:00 in the morning. good morning, greg. what does this mean? >> hey, bret. it's actually pretty serious. in fact, one of the worst case scenarios that have been bandied about. if true, the rods could get hotter and hotter and meltdown and shower
military? how does it end? >>> then, disaster in the pacific. nuclear nightmare scenario in japan. how prepare sd is united states? could it happen here? libya and japan, two crises with major consequences for the united states. >> as we begin or broadcast, the united states is at war in a third muslim country, libya. we'll take you there live in a moment. abc's team of correspondents is covering every angle of the story. i'll have an exclusive interview with moammar gadhafi's son, saif. i'll be joined here in the studios by chairman mike mullen. >>> but first, the latest headlines in the fast-moving story. a defiant moammar gadhafi is promising a long war, one day after the united states and a broad international coalition launched military strikes on his country. british and american ships and submarines fired 112 cruise missiles on more than 120 targets on the coast. b-2 bombers took out targets. they're plans to impose a no-fly zone to keep him from firing on his own people. sunday, tripoli shook with explosions and ant aircraft fire. libyan state television reported that 48 people
their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think of this particular instance with the united nations out suggesting military force is appropriate in libya? caller:
and work in tokyo come from other parts of japan. families are leaving tokyo for other parts of japan because of the fear of radiation. leaving is not an option for many. there are not enough places to go. if there is a major leak of radiation there does not seem to be a plan either. the family has not been told about it. they are watching developments further north with consternation. they have a baby and don't trust what the government is telling them. >> the government says we are safe but i don't think so. i don't trust them. >> one that? >> because [unintelligible] >> what is this? this is new? >> instead they are making their own plans. a car standing by to head south at a moment's notice. >> as they struggle goes on to prevent a major nuclear disaster many foreign governments are advising nationals to leave tokyo. the u.s. is not allowing any of its military within 80 kilometers of the plant. the japanese government has only told people within 20 kilometers to leave. we have obtained footage from a local tv crew wants to tell the story of those trapped. >> a japanese team makes
and responsibly. information is still coming in about the events unfolding in japan, but the administration is committed to learning from japan's experience as we work to continue to strengthen america's nuclear industry. >> rose: and then by telephone, ethan brawner of the "new york times" in bahrain. >> it's hard to imagine how they can get back out in the streets quickly. the tanks and the jeeps are out this very important places in great strength. again, on the other hand, bahrain really relies on the financial district and so on to have a normal life, and i think that they're going to have to end the curfew and the marshal law quality at some point. >> rose: we conclude this evening with a look at the continuing crisis in the middle east and north africa with rob malley, john negroponte, and zalmay khalilzad. >> i think what mrs. : clts has done, secretary clinton, has been to hold back on the idea of us stepping forward unilaterally on this but saying, look, if we get the requisite support from the international community, including the arab league, then the predicate has been set for
. we find ourselves with the world's most under reported story, a massive humanitarian crisis in japan caused by the quake and the following tsunami. what we could all be doing to help. dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. her morning begins with arthritis pain. that's a coffee and two pills. the afternoon tour begins with more pain and more pills. the evening guests arrive. back to sore knees. back to more pills. the day is done but hang on... her doctor recommended aleve. just 2 pills can keep arthritis pain away all day with fewer pills than tylenol. this is lara who chose 2 aleve and fewer pills for a day free of pain. and get the all day pain relief of aleve in liquid gels. and fewer pills for a day free of pain. but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at lendingtree.com, where customers save an average of $293 a month. call lending tree at... today. [ male announcer ] when you have plaque psoria
cuisinart. >> caught on air, disaster in japan, 11:00 p.m. eastern eastern on msnbc. you can have the last word online at our blog, and follow my tweets at lawrence. "the rachel maddow show" is up next. sitting in tonight, chris haze. good evening. >> good evening. thank you for staying with us the next hour. rachel has the night off. >>> the nuclear crisis in japan is still volatile tonight. there have been numerous developments today. we'll get to those shortly. we begin with something you should never have to ask, something that should never be a question. are we at war? yes, we are at war in iraq and afghanistan, and maybe sort of in pakistan as well. but are we at war again in another middle eastern country? it is not a provocative rhetorical question, it is one so-called no fly zone over libya and to take all necessary measures to protect civilians under attack. faced with threat from moammar gadhafi of a massacre of his own civilians, united nations approved military action against libya, which is a big fricking deal. for us, for the united nations, for the region. yet what
in the grapevine. nuclear fallout in japan is now as bad as the three-mile incident but what does that incident but what does that mean? >> brett: they say conditions at the damaged plant in japan are grave but not badly deteriorating. but they raised the crisis from a four to a five on seven-point scale that puts it on par with the three-mile island incident. they sprayed water for a second day as officials continued their efforts to lay emergency power line to reconnect the cooling system. greg palkot has the latest. >> reporter: in earthquake zone in northeastern japan, in tokyo and around the country there was a minute of silence one week after the devastating earthquake and tsunami hit. japanese prime minister spoke to his people. we are going to create from japan from scratch, its strong resolve we all must share. there was strong resolve with stricken reactors in the quake zone. fire engines were used to douse the overheating facilities. electric lines are hoped to be operative this weekend. firemen were getting to join other embattled workers and government finally admitted that it as b
questions about who is really responsible. i'm david wright in osaka, japan. >>> and now to an environmental scare closer to home. over the weekend a mile's long patch of sludge showed up in the gulf of mexico and washed up on the shores of louisiana's jefferson parish. the coast guard collected samples and officials say it does not appear to be from the bp oil spill. they say it is probably sediment washed into the gulf from the mississippi river. >>> the suspect in a grizzly murder at a yoga shop will be in court today. brittany norwood has been charged with first-degree murder. police say she killed her coworker and created an elaborate rouse to hide the crime. >> reporter: police say it was a fair of shoes that tipped them off. the crime scene had two sets of bloody footprints but one looked like it was faked. when police found norwood bound and gagged, they say the position she was tied up in was suspicious, with her hands tied above her head, she may have tied herself up. >> as we began analyzing the forensic evidence and looked at the medical reports, it was not supporting what the --
>>> good morning. breaking news. a surge in radiation levels at the crippled nuclear plant in japan forces emergency crews to evacuate overnight. while they are now getting back to work, there are new fears that those 50 heroic workers could be running out of options today, wednesday, march 16, 2011. r captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning. welcome to "today" on a wednesday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> good morning, everyone. i'm savannah guthrie. meredith is on assignment. you just think about the pressure those workers must be under, the sacrifice they may be making. they are being dubbed the fukushima 50, one of the last lines of defense against an all-out meltdown. >> imagine the concern when they were temporarily pulled from the plant overnight after radiation levels spiked for a short term. another concern, the second fire reactor number four today, where spent fuel rods are being stored. >> in a rare appearance, japan's emperor delivered a televised address saying he was, quote, deeply worried, but urged people not to give up hope. we are going to have
bargaining law from taking effect and nuclear fallout from japan gets an upgrade. live from our studio in washington is special report. >> brett: u.s. ambassador susan rice says muammar khadafy is in violation of resolution that demanded a cease-fire in libya. they called on khadafy to halt military attacks on civilians and if the libyan leader does not stand down, the u.s. will launch military action against him. but he said the summit will not send ground troops into the country. we have team coverage. doug is at the pentagon with the u.s. role and logistics of implementing a no-fly zone. we begin with senior correspondent with rick leventhal who is live in libya in benghazi. >> reporter: it's safe to say that we've seen more check points popping up, more young men with small arms and concern about khadafy's army with libyan official on live television saying that the army was actually on the outskirts of this city, but was not planning to come in. this after reports that the cease-fire was followed by heavier fire from khadafy's army against civilians and soldiers rebel fighters. we
him. so now he is in something -- like crabs coming out of japan, being pulled down by everyone. what is right? what is wrong? president bush was too fast to go into war. they say he is too slow. he is going to take his time to see if he is right and do the right thing by people, not just black people, ever ready. this man loves everybody. you got white people that created this mess and that is coming down on him like he did it. something is wrong with this world. we see things going on and look at it in an abstract way. was notthis war started by president obama. we did not start having money shortage from president obama. he is the first black african american president. you white people sitting around a pole and give your opinion about things. -- around tables and give your opinions about things. you always have done best. this. guehost: our thanks to al- jazeera that is showing us what is going on in libya. from "the new york times", the allies open the air assault on gaddafi forces. residents interviewed. there was heavy fighting and the city center and pro-gaddafi snipers could
countries? if there is any other country i would move to, it would be japan because they are such a great country. i want to say that we do not need to by our friends via financial aid. this is ridiculous. host: we do not need to by our friends. guest: is a matter of developing or alliances, working together in the interest of the united states of america. in haiti, when there is poverty and people do not have homes or a place to live, it is not a matter of buying our friends but to make sure we can bring stability in the country because they are right on our border. the same thing with mexico. people travel everywhere and we are all interconnected. i hope that in addition to suppor >> in about 20 minutes we will take you live to the white house for a news conference with president obama. among the possible topics, libya and the impact of the sue tsunan the west coast. live coverage when it starts, scheduled now for 12:30 eastern, and can we'll have that here on c-span2. a new member of congress, kevin yoder, a freshman representative from kansas who also sits on the gop's appropriations
security council. and to add additional at-on sanctions from our partners, including the e.u., japan, and others. when you are trying to sanction iran, no matter how powerful you are and how much we can do, it is imperative that we get the international community to support it. otherwise, there is too much leakage. we have limited that, and i feel strongly that we are making an impact. >> thank you, and i request written responses that you offered to the questions that you are not able to answer because i have so many, including the deposition of the libyan officials, which is so timely. my good friend, the ranking member. >> i want to commend my colleagues on the committee the speech that secretary clinton gave in addition to her estimate -- excellent testimony, but yesterday, going to the human rights council, where she discussed libya, iran, and other issues come up quite a remarkable presentation, particularly in pointing out ypocrisy of ouriran's condemnations of libya. i would like asked -- try to get into issues in this short time. one, the israeli-palestinian process. the que
an impression, barbara, about how news of japan sinks into one of the most seismically active country in the world? it's a good question. a lot of my iranian friends have been very afraid about the brashear. -- brashear reactor. i had one friend tell me it's such a hodgepodge of technology. the germans started it in the 1970's and you have chinese bits, russian bits that they're afraid if you plug it in you're afraid the whole thing's beginning to to blow up anyway. now you have japan. it's a very cautionary tale for the iranians. you notice brashear as that -- has not opened. i would bet that it's going to be a while before that reactor starts up if it ever does and if they don't have a functioning nuclear power plant, why do they need all these lower enriched uniform for? -- uranium for? that's in favor as well as all the other problems that's going on, the assassinations of nuclear scientists and so on. it definitely could be a factor in suggesting that they might slow down. i don't think they're going to give up their determination to have a pro
aspiration of the iranians for a long time. do you had the impression, barbara, how news of japan at that didn't one of the most seismically active countries in the world? >> a lot my iranian friends have been wary of the it bashir reactor opening. the german started in the 1970's, and you have chinese and russians, but if you plug it into the whole thing will blow up anyway. and now you have had japan. it is a very cautionary tale for the iranians. bashir has not opened. there were problems with the fuel rods, some say sabotage of the pumps. i think it will be awhile before the reactor starts up, if it ever does. if they do not have a functioning power plant, what did they mine all of the -- in range all the or uranium for? -- what did dave enrich all of the uranium for? it could be a factor in projecting that they might slow down. i do not think they will give up their determination on those who have a program and to say that they have a right to the program. that as a nationalistic issue. they will not go away. >> that is a lesson not just for iran but for the entire middle eas
informed. but there is just so much going on right now, what with japan and libya, the 2012 presidential race that half an hour just isn't enough. even if i leave out all the facts. so tonight, i'm going to cover it all at once. colonel gadhafi announced he's going to travel to iowa to dump sea water on the nuclear reactors which were attacked by france and england in retaliation for the earthquake, which polls show is the most qualified candidate. >> all right. welcome to "morning joe." it is 6:00 on the east coast. too bad we're not there. good morning. it's thursday, march 24th. joe and i are in los angeles again this morning. what time is it here? >> it's 1:15. here in los angeles, elizabeth taylor passed away. they are asking whether elizabeth taylor may have been the biggest movie star ever. of course, america will be remembering her over the next few days. >> she might have been. >> there is for so many reasons, through so many decades she was married to john warner, a senator. but he was number four or five. but also, of course, in the '60s and '70s. most really, most associated
afghanistan by the end of the year. follow the house live, here on c-span. >> earlier today, japan's prime minister called the damage from the earthquake the most severe challenge the nation has faced since world war ii. friday's disasters damage a series of nuclear reactors, particularly -- potentially sending one to a personal -- a partial meltdown. this statement is about 10 minutes. >> i would like to express my deepest sympathy to those who have been affected by the quake, and also in the disaster stricken areas, as well as to the people of japan who are in a very difficult situation. people remain very calm, and i would like to express my deepest gratitude as well as my respect to all those who are behaving very calmly. boeing yesterday, today we worked very hard to rescue people, and so far, the self- defense force as well as police and firefighters and maritime are able to save about 12,000 people. i would like to explain about the rescue efforts. the self-defense forces, all of the forces have mobilized 50,000 people, and they are to be doubled to 100,000, and the police officers,
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